What laws protect women’s civil rights?

What are the laws protecting women’s rights?

WOMEN-RELATED LAWS

  • RA 6949: Declaring March 8 as National Women’s Day.
  • RA 7877: Anti-Sexual Harassment Act of 1995.
  • RA 8353: Anti-Rape Law of 1997.
  • RA 6949: Anti-Trafficking in Person Act of 2003.
  • RA 6949: Anti-Violence against Women & Their Children Act of 2004.

What is Republic No 9262?

9262. An act defining violence against women and their children, providing for protective measures for victims, prescribing penalties therefor, and for other purposes. RA – 12th Congress.

What is RA No 7877?

AN ACT DECLARING SEXUAL HARASSMENT UNLAWFUL IN THE EMPLOYMENT, EDUCATION OR TRAINING ENVIRONMENT, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES.

What is RA 7192 all about?

AN ACT PROMOTING THE INTEGRATION OF WOMEN AS FULL AND EQUAL PARTNERS OF MEN IN DEVELOPMENT AND NATION BUILDING AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES.

What is RA 9262 in the Philippines?

RA 9262 is the Anti-Violence Against Women and their Children Act of 2004. The Act classifies violence against women and children (VAWC) as a public crime.

What is RA 6725 all about?

6725 May 12, 1989. AN ACT STRENGTHENING THE PROHIBITION ON DISCRIMINATION AGAINST WOMEN WITH RESPECT TO TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF EMPLOYMENT, AMENDING FOR THE PURPOSE ARTICLE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-FIVE OF THE LABOR CODE, AS AMENDED.

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Can a woman be liable under RA 9262?

Women can also be liable under the law. These are the lesbian partners/girlfriends or former partners of the victim with whom she has or had a sexual or dating relationship.

What is the difference between RA 9262 and RA 7610?

RA 7610 (Section 28) provides that the offended party shall be immediately placed under the protective custody of the DSWD. RA 9262 (Sec. 8) provides for the issuance of “Protection Orders”.

Who may file the protection order?

Petitions for protection orders may be filed by any of the following persons: 1) the offended party; 2) parents or guardians of the offended party; 3) ascendants, descendants or collateral relatives within the fourth civil degree of consanguinity or affinity; 4) officers or social workers of the Department of Social …